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The Port of Novorossiysk has been one of the major gateways for Russian foreign trade by sea since the end of the 19th century. Construction of modern facilities first commenced at the Port in 1957, when the Soviet government began to build berths in the Port’s western and central districts, the Sheskharis oil terminal, a passenger terminal, and other infrastructure.

  
Today, the deep-water Port of Novorossiysk is Russia’s largest sea port in terms of cargo volume according to the Association of Russian Sea Ports, and in 2005 it was Europe's fifth largest commercial sea port by cargo volume, according to Global Insight/ISL. The Port is one of the few Russian sea ports in the Black Sea-Azov basin, which is one of only three commercially viable gateways for passage by ship between Russia and the open seas.

  
The Port is situated in the eastern part of the Black Sea, at the top of the Tsemesskaya Bay. The Port is one of the few Russian sea ports in the Black Sea-Azov basin, which is one of only three commercially viable gateways for passage by ship between Russia and the open seas. The Port’s relative proximity to the world’s major foreign markets makes it an expedient outlet for shipment of cargoes from or to southern and central Russia, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. For example, the voyage from Southeast Asia to cargo destinations in southern and central Russia via Novorossiysk is approximately eight days shorter than the route via the Rotterdam/Hamburg-St. Petersburg corridor.

 
The Tsemesskaya Bay does not freeze in winter, allowing year-round navigation and, as a result, year-round operation of NCSP’s facilities. In addition, the Port’s system of sea walls and breakwaters buffers its harbour sufficiently to allow NCSP’s Port facilities to operate during all but the strongest storms each year.

 
The transport hub in Novorossiysk connects NCSP’s facilities at the Port to extensive railroad and highway networks providing access to the major industrial, agricultural and population centres and other key cargo origins and destinations in southern and central Russia, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. 


The acquisition of PTP Ltd was a transformative step for NCSP Group that enabled the company to dramatically increase the scale of its business, expand its geographic presence, and gain access to new markets and new opportunities for organic growth and acquisition of port assets. The acquisition secured NCSP Group’s leading position by cargo turnover among European port operators and vastly increased its lead over its nearest competitors in Russia.

An essential condition of this deal was the sale of the controlling stake in PJSC NCSP to the beneficiaries of Primorsk Trade Port Ltd, represented by JSC Transneft and Russian businessman Ziyavudin Magomedov.